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Professor Masateru TANIGUCHI was selected as a NISTEP Researcher

Prof. Masateru TANIGUCHI, Department of Bio-Nanotechnology, has been selected as a recipient of “NISTEP Researcher” by the National Institute of Science and Technology Policy (NISTEP). This year, NISTEP examined performances of some 2,000 researchers and specialists and made the decision to bestow the title on 10 researchers with impressive achievements. Professor Taniguchi was one of those 10.

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Professor Yoichi Ando receives the Osaka Science Prize.

Professor Ando, Department of Quantum Functional Materials, has been selected as a recipient of the 32nd [2014] Osaka Science Prize. The Osaka Science Prize is conferred upon two mid-carrier (aged 50 or under) researchers based in Osaka and its surrounding areas who have made significant contributions to the developments of science and technology.

The prize is given to Professor Ando for his “Pioneering research of Topological Insulators and Superconductors”.

The Award Ceremony and the Commemorative Lectures were held on Wednesday, October 29, at the Main Hall of the Osaka Science & Technology Center.

for more information

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Development of Red Fluorescence Probe of Intracellular Singlet Oxygen during Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

Prof. T Majima and coworkers have recently developed a red fluorescence sensor that can detect intracellular singlet oxygen (1O2) formed during photodynamic therapy (PDT) with high chemical and location selectivity.

1O2, molecular oxygen in the lowest excited state, has a critical role in the cell-killing mechanism of PDT. Monitoring formation and reaction rate of 1O2 during is urgently required since the total formation amount of 1O2 is directly related to the therapeutic effect of PDT. So far, 1O2 phosphorescence measurement or commercially available 1O2 fluorescence sensor, Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green (Molecular Probes®), have been mainly used to monitor 1O2. However, both of the methods are not sufficient to obtain real-time images of intracellular 1O2 formation and dynamics during PDT.

Recently, Majima et al. have proposed a new far-red fluorescence probe of 1O2, namely, Si-DMA, composed of silicon-containing rhodamine and anthracene moieties as a chromophore and a 1O2 reactive site, respectively. In the presence of 1O2, fluorescence of Si-DMA increases 17 times. With the advantage of negligible self-oxidation by photoirradiation and selective mitochondrial localization, Si-DMA is particularly suitable for imaging 1O2 during PDT. For the first time, 1O2 generated during PDT has been successfully visualized with a spatial resolution of a single mitochondrial tubule. This work has been reported in J. Am. Chem. Soc. (DOI: 10.1021/ja504279r).

ht_20140806a

Figure caption:
Figure 1. a) Chemical structure of Si-DMA and its endoperoxized form, Si-DMEP. Upon reacting with singlet oxygen, fluorescence of Si-DMA increases by approximately 20 times. b) Monitoring intracellular singlet oxygen during photoirradiation. Si-DMA can visualize the location of singlet oxygen generation with the spatial resolution of a single mitochondrial tubule.

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2015
2014
2013

The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University

contact home japanese
HOME > Activity Reports > Research Activities

Research Activities

Professor Masateru TANIGUCHI was selected as a NISTEP Researcher

Prof. Masateru TANIGUCHI, Department of Bio-Nanotechnology, has been selected as a recipient of “NISTEP Researcher” by the National Institute of Science and Technology Policy (NISTEP). This year, NISTEP examined performances of some 2,000 researchers and specialists and made the decision to bestow the title on 10 researchers with impressive achievements. Professor Taniguchi was one of those 10.

For more information

Top of Page

Professor Yoichi Ando receives the Osaka Science Prize.

Professor Ando, Department of Quantum Functional Materials, has been selected as a recipient of the 32nd [2014] Osaka Science Prize. The Osaka Science Prize is conferred upon two mid-carrier (aged 50 or under) researchers based in Osaka and its surrounding areas who have made significant contributions to the developments of science and technology.

The prize is given to Professor Ando for his “Pioneering research of Topological Insulators and Superconductors”.

The Award Ceremony and the Commemorative Lectures were held on Wednesday, October 29, at the Main Hall of the Osaka Science & Technology Center.

for more information

ht_20140806a

Top of Page

Development of Red Fluorescence Probe of Intracellular Singlet Oxygen during Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

Prof. T Majima and coworkers have recently developed a red fluorescence sensor that can detect intracellular singlet oxygen (1O2) formed during photodynamic therapy (PDT) with high chemical and location selectivity.

1O2, molecular oxygen in the lowest excited state, has a critical role in the cell-killing mechanism of PDT. Monitoring formation and reaction rate of 1O2 during is urgently required since the total formation amount of 1O2 is directly related to the therapeutic effect of PDT. So far, 1O2 phosphorescence measurement or commercially available 1O2 fluorescence sensor, Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green (Molecular Probes®), have been mainly used to monitor 1O2. However, both of the methods are not sufficient to obtain real-time images of intracellular 1O2 formation and dynamics during PDT.

Recently, Majima et al. have proposed a new far-red fluorescence probe of 1O2, namely, Si-DMA, composed of silicon-containing rhodamine and anthracene moieties as a chromophore and a 1O2 reactive site, respectively. In the presence of 1O2, fluorescence of Si-DMA increases 17 times. With the advantage of negligible self-oxidation by photoirradiation and selective mitochondrial localization, Si-DMA is particularly suitable for imaging 1O2 during PDT. For the first time, 1O2 generated during PDT has been successfully visualized with a spatial resolution of a single mitochondrial tubule. This work has been reported in J. Am. Chem. Soc. (DOI: 10.1021/ja504279r).

ht_20140806a

Figure caption:
Figure 1. a) Chemical structure of Si-DMA and its endoperoxized form, Si-DMEP. Upon reacting with singlet oxygen, fluorescence of Si-DMA increases by approximately 20 times. b) Monitoring intracellular singlet oxygen during photoirradiation. Si-DMA can visualize the location of singlet oxygen generation with the spatial resolution of a single mitochondrial tubule.

Top of Page

back number
2016
2015
2014
2013